Gurudev on Maharishi – Part II

February 11, 2008 at 4:03 pm 2 comments

young_gurudev7.jpg

 Six or seven of us – including a few pundits and Maharishi Mahesh Yogi – met at a house in Delhi in the late 70s. A Sanatani pundit was chanting Sanskrit verse in praise of Saraswati, the goddess of learning. The import of those words were: “Goddess, clad in white, exuding the essence of Brahmn in thought and expression/ The Original One, spread all over the world/ Holding the rosary and the scriptures”.

An Arya Samaji pundit was refuting it. What ensued was a heated argument as each justified his own view. Maha-rishiji was sitting there, enjoying the whole argument.

He glanced at me, playing with his mala and gesturing towards himself, laughing out loud. He repeated the gestures to make sure i caught on to what he was hinting at: “Fools, don’t look for Saraswati in a picture. I am Saraswati”.

Maharishiji sat smiling, clad in white, exuding the essence of Brahmn in thought and expression, the Original One, spread all over the world, holding a mala, with a book before him! He went on to explain that Saraswati is that consciousness in which total knowledge manifests: the One without a second. The pundits who were still arguing, never got the subtlety of His gestures.

Often people repeatedly make affirmations such as “I am Brahmn, the Self” in the name of Self-awareness or spiritual realisation. Maharishiji was against such affirmations, as these were only at the level of thought, a gross level, not in the realm of experience.

The Shankaracharya is called Vedanta Kesari, the Lion of Vedanta. I would say that Maha-rishiji was the true lion of Vedanta who had a unique way of expres-sing Vedanta. He was dignity personified. What he was, his persona, is inimitable.

He once planned a course for 10,000 persons in the Faridabad ashram. We had made arrangements for board and lodging for that number of people. Newspaper advertisements were released. A lot of effort went into the course.

On the big day, only 100 persons turned up for the course. When i mentioned this to him, Maha-rishiji chuckled and said: “Each one of them is worth a thousand people”. The next time, we planned for 20,000 people! He would say: “I never look back, i simply keep moving forward”.

He never let the past affect his outlook. He was above success and failure. Though seemingly engaged in mundane activities all day, he maintained such a depth of dispassion.

He would not tire of repeating the same thing; he would do so with the same enthusiasm.

Maharishiji was a tough task master. He would give tasks which were seemingly impossible to achieve and he never took ‘no’ for an answer. He had a unique way to dissolve rajas and doership in people. For instance, he would ask to meditate to stop the war between Iran and Iraq or reunify Germany or make a country invincible.

Overnight he would send people to lay the foundation stone for centres in different parts of the country, despite not owning any land there. Though this would seem impractical, it would help a sadhak, if he rightly understood, to move beyond the doership.

Maharishiji was a unique combination of emperor and ascetic, perfect disciple and Jagadguru, modern scientist and deep traditionalist. He respected all sadhus alike. In the body he was Brahmastha, now he is Brahmaleen

Advertisements

Entry filed under: Talks By H.H.Sri Ravi Shankar. Tags: , , .

Maharishi was an emperor and an ascetic – Article by H.H.Sri Sri Ravi Shankar Gurudev at Maharishi’s Samadhi

2 Comments Add your own

  • 1. cliff  |  February 12, 2008 at 9:00 am

    Cool article

    Reply
  • 2. Romana Markovic  |  February 13, 2008 at 7:37 am

    JAI GURU DEV OM

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Trackback this post  |  Subscribe to the comments via RSS Feed


Categories

Feeds


%d bloggers like this: